Older workers: great job performance

Fact: older workers easily outperform the youngsters

Older workers are mentally slow, technologically backward, burned out, etc. Right? Wrong, wrong, wrong, researchers say. Hire one today, because in fact, they rock on every front.

Optimistic in Bhutan

Half empty or half full? Optimism can be learned

In these times, optimism can be as difficult as it is necessary—and more difficult for some people than others. Researchers are learning how the negativists among us can train to be more optimistic.

Stress management: tai chi

Ready for anything: how to build personal resilience

In work and life, there will be setbacks. There may be outright tragedy. Change will shake you and the world. Here’s the research on what you can do now to make sure you snap back.

How do we get people to care about the future?

Societal transformation depends on communicating and embracing the long view. But the human impulse toward instant gratification is a powerful foe. Here are some potential workarounds.

Organizational health trumps everything else

And the best way to build organizational health? Create clarity. Overcommunicate clarity. Reinforce clarity. Here’s a must-read book for leaders committed to emotional intelligence in the workplace.

Recovering from mistakes: how Churchill did it

In addition to being a rock star statesman, Winston Churchill was a gifted and prolific painter. He used his relationship with art to reconnect with himself after failure—and move on to great things.

Believe in a kid, and she’ll give the world a symphony

Favio Chavez knows that music is powerful. And that believing in people is too. He made instruments out of trash, then taught kids others had given up on how to play. Talk about community building.

Urban mental health depends on community

City dwellers are more at risk for anxiety, depression, and even full-blown schizophrenia. But brain research suggests that among the preventive measures is a good circle of friends.

10 life lessons I learned on a mountain bike

Flip yourself over on a stone wall a few times, and you begin to ask why it’s happening. The answers start to look like life lessons. Here’s 10 worth sharing. Number one? Let go over the bumps.

Stress harms problem solving too. What to do?

Stress compromises your problem-solving performance. But new research from Carnegie Mellon indicates that self-affirmation—in the form of focusing on your values—can protect it.

Your brain is plastic. It’s designed to change

When readers of the Sharp Brains newsletter ask questions about neuroplasticity, the editors answer by linking to previously posted articles. Brilliant content marketing.

‘Fantastic Mistakes’: Advice from Neil Gaiman

Neil Gaiman’s advice to the University of the Arts graduating class of 2012 was simple: the old rules are crumbling, and nobody knows what the new rules are. So make up your own.

Media multitasking and learning don’t mix

Annie Murphy Paul points to research that shows how widespread media multitasking is (most college students text during class) and how it leads to leads to spottier, shallower learning.

Using the artistic process to spark societal change

Jeff Barnum is an artist and a change agent who sees direct links between the two. For starters, both depend on finding the solution while working on the problem. “We have to carve a way forward.”